Phone: 623-349-4822  |  Toll Free: 855-949-1500
in     by Brian Raymond 08.08.2016
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Gross Tonnage (GT) Is Not the Weight of a Ship

The typical cruise passenger will notice that cruise lines normally display their ship's "Gross Tonnage" (GT) in the list of ship's statistics (year built, number of crew, number of passengers, etc.). What most people don't know is that GT does not equate to the weight of the ship. Rather GT is a measurement of all the ship's volume of its enclosed spaces (above and below the water line), where 100 cubic feet of volume equals one ton.
 
Gross tonnage was initially used for cargo ships to determine the maximum amount of space for the storage of goods that could be stuffed inside a ship. While it doesn't seem particularly relevant to cruise ships, it is also used to determine which rules and regulations apply to a ship, its crew staffing levels, safety rules, and port fees. Because of this, it is the standard that most commonly is used to define a ship. 
 
For cruise ships, typically the larger the gross tonnage, the larger the ship is, the more passengers it can hold, and the more restaurants and entertainment facilities you'll find onboard.
 
Ship Cruise Line Class Gross Tons Passengers Market Launch
 Harmony of the Seas  Royal Caribbean  Oasis  226,963  5,479  Mass 2016
 Anthem of the Seas  Royal Caribbean  Quantum  168,666  4,180  Mass  2015
 Norwegian Escape  Norwegian  Breakaway  165,157  4,248  Mass  2015
 Norwegian Epic  Norwegian  Epic  155,873  4,100  Mass  2009
 Celebrity Reflection  Celebrity  Solstice  126,000 3,046  Premium 2012
 MS Koningsdam  Holland America  Pinnacle   99,500  2,650  Premium 2016
 Serenity  Crystal      68,870  1,070  Luxury  2003
 Explorer  Regent     54,000     750  Luxury  2016
 Quest  Seaborn     32,348     450  Luxury   2011

 


Brian RaymondWritten by Brian Raymond 

Brian owns Out Destinations, a premier gay travel agency featuring gay & mainstream cruises and tours, as well as customized vacations. Out Destinations also offers group travel, and social organization fundraising opportunities. For a free consultation, contact him toll free at 855-949-1500 or email him at brian@outdestinations.com.

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Phone: 623-349-4822  |  Toll Free: 855-949-1500
in     by Brian Raymond 08.08.2016
0
0.00 of 0 votes

Gross Tonnage (GT) Is Not the Weight of a Ship

The typical cruise passenger will notice that cruise lines normally display their ship's "Gross Tonnage" (GT) in the list of ship's statistics (year built, number of crew, number of passengers, etc.). What most people don't know is that GT does not equate to the weight of the ship. Rather GT is a measurement of all the ship's volume of its enclosed spaces (above and below the water line), where 100 cubic feet of volume equals one ton.
 
Gross tonnage was initially used for cargo ships to determine the maximum amount of space for the storage of goods that could be stuffed inside a ship. While it doesn't seem particularly relevant to cruise ships, it is also used to determine which rules and regulations apply to a ship, its crew staffing levels, safety rules, and port fees. Because of this, it is the standard that most commonly is used to define a ship. 
 
For cruise ships, typically the larger the gross tonnage, the larger the ship is, the more passengers it can hold, and the more restaurants and entertainment facilities you'll find onboard.
 
Ship Cruise Line Class Gross Tons Passengers Market Launch
 Harmony of the Seas  Royal Caribbean  Oasis  226,963  5,479  Mass 2016
 Anthem of the Seas  Royal Caribbean  Quantum  168,666  4,180  Mass  2015
 Norwegian Escape  Norwegian  Breakaway  165,157  4,248  Mass  2015
 Norwegian Epic  Norwegian  Epic  155,873  4,100  Mass  2009
 Celebrity Reflection  Celebrity  Solstice  126,000 3,046  Premium 2012
 MS Koningsdam  Holland America  Pinnacle   99,500  2,650  Premium 2016
 Serenity  Crystal      68,870  1,070  Luxury  2003
 Explorer  Regent     54,000     750  Luxury  2016
 Quest  Seaborn     32,348     450  Luxury   2011

 


Brian RaymondWritten by Brian Raymond 

Brian owns Out Destinations, a premier gay travel agency featuring gay & mainstream cruises and tours, as well as customized vacations. Out Destinations also offers group travel, and social organization fundraising opportunities. For a free consultation, contact him toll free at 855-949-1500 or email him at brian@outdestinations.com.

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