Phone: 623-349-4822  |  Toll Free: 855-949-1500
in     by Brian Raymond 07.05.2016
0
5.00 of 1 votes
This is going to sound very esoteric and unimportant. But, as more consumers decide to purchase airline tickets online, there is an increasing need for the traveling public to understand some of the rules related to “Interline Baggage” agreements between airlines.  These agreements govern how airlines pass or transfer your luggage from one airline to the next during your trip. 
 
Historically, when you checked in at the airline counter, the attendant would ask if you wanted your bags checked through to your final destination. To which you would smile appreciatively and say, “Of course.  Thanks.”  Some low cost airlines, like Southwest, did not have interline agreements, which meant their passengers had to pick up their luggage, and go to the check-in counter  to re-check their bags.

A few years ago, US Airways stopped interline transfers when a customer was using two different tickets (2 different PNRs).   And this is the point consumers need to understand.  If you purchase two separate tickets to get from Point A (your starting point) to your Ultimate Destination Point C (because you connected in a different city, Point B), American (Oneworld), United (Star Alliance) and Delta (SkyTeam) won't transfer your bags to your ultimate destination.  You must claim your luggage and re-check in with the next airline – that means going to baggage claim, next go to the second airline’s check in counter and check in (pay another checked luggage fee), AND then go through security again. Some ticket agents and some specific airlines will go ahead to check it through, but all three's interline agreements (Oneworld, Star Alliance and SkyTeam) explicitly state member airlines are only required to check bags through to the ultimate destination IF there is only a single ticket (PNR). 

Now you are probably scratching your head and saying why would I purchase two tickets?  Well, it is becoming more common as passengers look for ways to cut costs.  For instance, if you are flying from Denver to Athens, you might find that it is cheaper to buy a ticket from Denver to NYC, and then purchase a second ticket from NYC to Athens.   You can find similar instances flying within the US where it is cheaper to buy one ticket from your home airport to a connecting airport, and a second ticket from the connecting airport to your final destination.  In the past, the airlines would have checked your luggage through to your final destination as long as you showed them both tickets (or e-tickets).  Now American, United, and Delta will only check your bag through to the connection where you must reclaim and re-check them.  Unlike many baggage fees, these rules apply to members with elite status, and apply even if the second ticket is booked with an airline that is part of the same airline marketing partners/alliances.

Once again, we see the friendly skies becoming less friendly.


Brian RaymondWritten by Brian Raymond 

Brian owns Out Destinations, a premier gay travel agency featuring gay & mainstream cruises and tours, as well as customized vacations. Out Destinations also offers group travel, and social organization fundraising opportunities. For a free consultation, contact him toll free at 855-949-1500 or email him at brian@outdestinations.com.

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Phone: 623-349-4822  |  Toll Free: 855-949-1500
in     by Brian Raymond 07.05.2016
0
5.00 of 1 votes
This is going to sound very esoteric and unimportant. But, as more consumers decide to purchase airline tickets online, there is an increasing need for the traveling public to understand some of the rules related to “Interline Baggage” agreements between airlines.  These agreements govern how airlines pass or transfer your luggage from one airline to the next during your trip. 
 
Historically, when you checked in at the airline counter, the attendant would ask if you wanted your bags checked through to your final destination. To which you would smile appreciatively and say, “Of course.  Thanks.”  Some low cost airlines, like Southwest, did not have interline agreements, which meant their passengers had to pick up their luggage, and go to the check-in counter  to re-check their bags.

A few years ago, US Airways stopped interline transfers when a customer was using two different tickets (2 different PNRs).   And this is the point consumers need to understand.  If you purchase two separate tickets to get from Point A (your starting point) to your Ultimate Destination Point C (because you connected in a different city, Point B), American (Oneworld), United (Star Alliance) and Delta (SkyTeam) won't transfer your bags to your ultimate destination.  You must claim your luggage and re-check in with the next airline – that means going to baggage claim, next go to the second airline’s check in counter and check in (pay another checked luggage fee), AND then go through security again. Some ticket agents and some specific airlines will go ahead to check it through, but all three's interline agreements (Oneworld, Star Alliance and SkyTeam) explicitly state member airlines are only required to check bags through to the ultimate destination IF there is only a single ticket (PNR). 

Now you are probably scratching your head and saying why would I purchase two tickets?  Well, it is becoming more common as passengers look for ways to cut costs.  For instance, if you are flying from Denver to Athens, you might find that it is cheaper to buy a ticket from Denver to NYC, and then purchase a second ticket from NYC to Athens.   You can find similar instances flying within the US where it is cheaper to buy one ticket from your home airport to a connecting airport, and a second ticket from the connecting airport to your final destination.  In the past, the airlines would have checked your luggage through to your final destination as long as you showed them both tickets (or e-tickets).  Now American, United, and Delta will only check your bag through to the connection where you must reclaim and re-check them.  Unlike many baggage fees, these rules apply to members with elite status, and apply even if the second ticket is booked with an airline that is part of the same airline marketing partners/alliances.

Once again, we see the friendly skies becoming less friendly.


Brian RaymondWritten by Brian Raymond 

Brian owns Out Destinations, a premier gay travel agency featuring gay & mainstream cruises and tours, as well as customized vacations. Out Destinations also offers group travel, and social organization fundraising opportunities. For a free consultation, contact him toll free at 855-949-1500 or email him at brian@outdestinations.com.

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